Jazz crooner’s big voice almost silenced permanently‏

S. Davis

Jazz crooner’s big voice almost silenced permanently 

Romantic ending for “What Happened To Romance” singer Steven Davis after suffering a severe vocal cord bleed

Los Angeles, California (14 July 2015): Hard to fathom how close the jazz world came to losing the grand, velvety voice of crooner Steven Davis, who is presently garnering airplay and accolades from around the world on the heels of his first big band offering, “What Happened To Romance.” A severe vocal bleed silenced him completely for seven months and doctors did not know if the Nashville-based singer-songwriter would ever be able to sing again. It took over a year for him to fully heal, rebounding remarkably to record three original albums in less than one year.

Awakened in the middle of the night in early November 2013 by a profound coughing spell lasting several hours, Davis aspirated into his lungs and mistakenly thought that he was experiencing a bronchial problem. Instead of rushing to the ER, he waited nine days before seeking medical care.

“The doctors didn’t know if I would ever really sing again as I waited too long for treatment and the bleed was severe and very serious,” recalled Davis, who was treated by world-renowned voice specialist Dr. Robert Ossoff, executive medical director of the Vanderbilt Voice Center in Nashville. “The worst concern with this sort of bleed is scar tissue in the wake of healing. I was put on a very aggressive treatment immediately with massive doses of steroids for many weeks. During the course of the next seven months, I was put on absolute mandatory vocal silence multiple times with some periods lasting a month. No talking and no whispering period. This sort of silence draws you inward. It’s a very Zen experience actually. The emotional layers take on an almost spiritual quality.”

It was happenstance that the injury occurred after Davis had taken a prolong break from singing and had just begun testing his voice in the studio in preparation for recording for the first time in many years.

“There was great irony in that I had finally come home to singing after such a long hiatus, facing my fears in stepping up to the mic for the first time in years, only to be silenced by the bleed,” Davis said.

Shortly after the extended recovery period was complete and Davis was cleared to resume singing, he met Josh Charles and Alissa Moreno, the songwriting and production team known as The 88s. Work commenced almost immediately on “What Happened To Romance,” a swinging big band session recorded in New York City with accompaniment by The After Midnight Orchestra comprised of veterans of the Count Basie and Duke Ellington bands. Primarily encompassing new compositions authored by Davis and The 88s that are in the spirit of the Great American Songbook, radio programmers, reviewers and enamored fans are warmly embracing Davis’s retro sound, fresh material and charming tales of romantic ardor that could become modern standards.

Davis and The 88s spent the spring in Los Angeles recording and are wrapping up a big band Christmas album highlighting original selections plus one chestnut, “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas,” a stocking stuffer that will be released in time for the holiday season. Also in the can, but being held for release in 2016 is a more intimate Davis recording date in which the mellifluous baritone is backed by a jazz trio. After nearly losing the only thing he’s known since he was five years-old, he is passionately inspired, which is part of the fire behind the prolific period.

“On the wings of my recovery, I began writing and recording with a renewed perspective and a fresh approach to making music. There is more joy, more satisfaction, more pleasure and more fun in making music now – more than I ever could have imagined,” said Davis, whose bewitching celebration of love, “Perfectly Perfect” from “What Happened To Romance,” serves as the splendid soundtrack to an international television spot for Centralway Numbrs, a Germany-based mobile banking application. “The crisis served as a personal awakening and re-embrace of a gift that often times can be easily taken for granted in the most subtle of ways. Now I treasure the gift, I respect the gift and I honor the gift – more than I have in my entire career. I’m so lucky, so grateful for my reprieve from the edge of silence.”

For more information about Davis, please visit www.StevenDavisMusic.com.

Swept up in the magic of a classic “Romance”‏

Steven Davis

Swept up in the magic of a classic “Romance”

 

Jazz crooner Steven Davis releases his first big band album, “What Happened To Romance,”

a swinging retro original patterned after the Great American Songbook.

Los Angeles, California (24 June 2015): The promise and thrill of romance brought a Los Angeles crowd and industry types out en masse last Friday night (June 19), packing trendy Molly Malone’s Irish Pub for a set by jazz crooner Steven Davis during which he previewed songs from “What Happened To Romance,” the vocalist’s first big band foray that was released Tuesday (June 23) by First Second Records. Dashing in a dapper black suit and crisp white shirt, Davis plied his charismatically classic voice to the refreshingly original songs of love that he wrote with the album’s producers The 88sJosh Charles and Alissa Moreno. Opening his smitten heart, he shared the timeless tales of romantic ardor that serve as muse on the charming 14-track album while backed by the swinging grooves etched by a tight acoustic jazz ensemble.

“What Happened To Romance” was recorded in New York City where Davis’s “chairman of the board” voice was buttressed by The After Midnight Orchestra, comprised of original members of the Count Basie and Duke Ellington bands, under the direction of Andy Farber, who also deftly served as arranger. The big band setting suits Davis snuggly like his custom-tailored attire. Jazz radio stations across the nation were serviced the album for airplay and early reviews have unanimously embraced the recording.

The summer swoon stirred by “What Happened To Romance” bodes to enchant hearts straight through the holiday season as the regal new disc marks only the beginning of a remarkably prolific period for Davis and The 88s, who met and began collaborating last fall in Nashville. This spring, the velvety vocalist and creative team have been ensconced in famed Los Angeles recording studios East West crafting a big band Christmas collection of original material along with one evergreen, “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas.” Also in the vault is an outing in which Davis is placed in the more intimate confines of a jazz trio. Look for the holiday album to be released in time to gift lovers this year while the trio session will be unwrapped next year.

Below are snippets from some of the album reviews:

“The swinging 14 tracker is an affirmation that romance is always in vogue and sonically the set has its roots in the era of the Great American Songbook…. though of the 14 songs, only two are actually from that era…Such is the quality of the original songs that there’s no visible (should that be audible?) hiatus between them and those venerable chestnuts.” – Soul and Jazz and Funk

The album is a throwback to the jazz and swing ‘American Standard’ sound of the ’40s and focuses on sharp melodies and meaningful lyrics.” – East Valley Tribune

“He sounds Rat Pack hip on ‘Love Comes Right On Time’ and has an excellent sense of timing on the Latin ‘Perfectly Perfect.’ Whether he’s shooting for Vegas, Hollywood or Branson, he’s gonna please the crowd.” – Jazz Weekly

“All at once insist comparisons in a class with Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Dean Martin and Rosemary Clooney. Steven has a voice suitable for this genre. The songs he and Josh Charles and Alissa Moreno wrote therefore really fit into the list of the repertoire of the aforementioned masters.” – Keys & Chords

“It’s a nice comfy fit throughout, especially since Davis doesn’t try to make you think he’s Sinatra. All that’s missing here is the sound of martini glasses clinking.” – Midwest Record

“They bring back the grand sound of the big band era…taking me back to the Bing Crosby, Dean Martin, and Frank Sinatra sound” – The Pulse of Entertainment/EUR Web

 

For additional information, please visit www.StevenDavisMusic.com.