MICHAEL FRANKS GETS INTIMATE WITH “THE MUSIC IN MY HEAD”

It’s been seven years since Michael Franks’ last album was released, and his fans are elated to receive “The Music In My Head” on June 8th. It is his 18th album to date in his 45 year career. Franks is known for his eloquent and poetic lyrics, clever song titles, and smooth charismatic delivery. Michael describes this project as “very true” and “very personal”– one in which you can hear and feel his “love for nature” as well as his everlasting love for his wife Claudia of 42 years. Once again, Franks has given us a plethora of musical gems while working in the studio with his musical comrades: Jimmy Haslip, David Spinozza, Gil Goldstein, Scott Petito, Charles Blenzig, Eric Marienthal, Gary Meek, Bob Mintzer, and Rachel Z. He feels especially blessed to have also collaborated with his dear friend Chuck Loeb on the song “As Long As We’re Both Together.” It would be one of the last recordings Loeb would work on. Franks’ collection of ten new songs embraces listeners and glides them through a journey of love, nature, science-fiction, old LA jazz clubs, and healing relationships.

Listen and enjoy my interview with Michael Franks:


MFranksCover

 

CAROL DUBOC CAN SEE THROUGH “COLORED GLASSES”

“Hypnotic,” the first single from Carol Duboc’s latest album, “Colored Glasses,” is the perfect description of the collection of original songs being released on September 18, 2015. Carol collaborated again with her friend and colleague, Jeff Lorber, to produce “Colored Glasses.” And what better way to complete a new album than to once again enlist the talented Jimmy Haslip, Michael Thompson, and Vinnie Colaiuta? Additionally, Eric Marienthal, Hubert Laws, and Paul Jackson, Jr. added their special touches to the long-time anticipated new album. Carol is lyrically gifted, and her uncanny ability to tell stories is a part of her charm. “Colored Glasses” tells the story of someone in love who sees and has seen love through “Colored Glasses”–a little something everyone can relate to. Writing this album has been therapeutic for Carol, empowering her to remove any “Colored Glasses” she has ever worn. Carol recorded a video for the song “Wavelength,” and she was joined by her band live on the sands of Venice Beach. Little did she know that a few onlookers would join them, giving it even more life. Admittedly, Carol had a fantastic time sharing that time with colleagues and strangers, all coming together for a common cause. The end result: perfectly befitting the song, a long line of people on the beach doing one long wave. Carol has an album release on September 18th at Hollywood’s Baked Potato and will be joined by Lorber, Haslip, and Thompson.

Listen to Carol and I discuss love, lost, and the healing power of music:

Carol Duboc

 

Groove therapy: contemporary jazz singer Carol Duboc keeps her diary open on “Colored Glasses”‏

Carol Duboc

Groove therapy: contemporary jazz singer Carol Duboc keeps her diary open on “Colored Glasses”

Her seventh album, due September 18, is bolstered by collaborator Jeff Lorber’s R&B rhythms.

Los Angeles, California (30 July 2015): On Carol Duboc’s deeply personal 2013 release, “Smile,” the contemporary jazz singer-songwriter opened up in a way that she had never done so before, revealing the pain and heartache involved with dissolving her marriage while being the mother of a young daughter. She described writing the album with producer and jazz keyboards legend Jeff Lorber as therapeutic. Her therapy continues on “Colored Glasses,” a Gold Note Music ten-track disc written and produced by Duboc and Lorber set for release on September 18 and launched that evening with a Hollywood concert date that will be streamed online.

Two years on, Duboc’s new material details her struggles with cutting the ties of the relationship, one tinged by her partner’s delusional view of the world. Writing lyrics and melodies to rhythm tracks sent to her by Lorber, Duboc addresses the realities and realizations of moving forward with honesty and candor, even if she felt her ex was hiding the truth behind “colored glasses,” thus spawning the album’s title. But she acknowledges her own role as well.

“Some people refuse to see the world as it really is or life as it is, and to be honest, I was so caught up in the hypnotic love that I didn’t see things as they really are either,” admitted Duboc, who titled the first single “Hypnotic.” “I think this album is going to surprise people. It’s about letting go completely and moving on emotionally. And it may be the funkiest solo record I’ve ever made.”

Lorber’s R&B rhythms are lively throughout the soulful, sophisticated session of jazzy adult pop tunes. A marquee supporting cast brings high-caliber musicianship to the taut grooves with stellar performances by Jimmy Haslip (electric bass), Brian Bromberg (acoustic bass), Vinnie Colaiuta (drums), guitarists Paul Jackson, Jr. and Michael Thompson, Hubert Laws (flute), Eric Marienthal (sax), Lenny Castro (percussion) and multi-instrumentalist Lorber on keyboards, piano, bass and guitar. Dave Mann punches up several cuts with crisp horns and vivid horn arrangements that add vibrancy, lushness and depth.

“Hypnotic” will be serviced to radio next month coinciding with the release of a video lensed on Venice Beach for the album’s “Wavelength,” a danceable guitar and horn-driven song about intuitive communication between partners. To mark the album’s release and celebrate coming through the other side of the relationship, Duboc will perform at the famed jazz joint the Baked Potato on the release date (Sept. 18), which will be streamed live on her website (www.CarolDuboc.com). Lorber, Haslip and Thompson are among the musicians from the album’s lineup already confirmed to be backing the singer that night.

A native of Kansas City, Missouri, Duboc has been living in Los Angeles ever since she attended USC Thornton’s School of Music. Prior to launching her solo recording career in 2001with the critically-acclaimed “With All That I Am,” Duboc wrote hits on gold and platinum-selling albums, including records by Patti LaBelle, Chante Moore, Tom Jones, Stephanie Mills, Jade, Fine Yong Cannibals, Maurice White and the late George Duke. Possessing multimedia appeal, the photogenic blond had a supporting role on the silver screen in “Be Cool” alongside John Travolta, Uma Thurman and Danny DeVito.

The songs on “Colored Glasses” are:

“Hypnotic”

“Every Shade of Blue”

“Celestial Skies”

“Wavelength”

“Breathing”

“Trajectory”

“Spinning”

“Colored Glasses”

“Walking in My Sleep”

“Code Red”

Additional information is available at www.carolduboc.com.

AL DEGREGORIS DID IT “ALL IN GOOD TIME”

When you start playing piano at age four and over time evolve into a multi-instrumentalist all while still a young man, your future has promise. Al DeGregoris simply wanted to be like his older family members he witnessed performing in a band. He had to have it, and so he went after it. To his advantage, Al not only honed his talent but also learned the technical side of music and owned his own recording studios. Armed with an arsenal of talent and skills, DeGregoris’ collaboration with Nils and Jeff Lorber on “All In Good Time” was majestic. Significantly different from his first two albums, Al describes “All In Good Time” as “organic.” It was recorded live with some of the finest musicians in the industry.

Al and I discuss the new album and what he admired most about working with Nils and Lorber:

Al DeGregoris

Al DeGregoris

AL DEGREGORIS DID IT “ALL IN GOOD TIME”

When you start playing piano at age four and over time evolve into a multi-instrumentalist all while still a young man, your future has promise. Al DeGregoris simply wanted to be like his older family members he witnessed performing in a band. He had to have it, and so he went after it. To his advantage, Al not only honed his talent but also learned the technical side of music and owned his own recording studios. Armed with an arsenal of talent and skills, DeGregoris’ collaboration with Nils and Jeff Lorber on “All In Good Time” was majestic. Significantly different from his first two albums, Al describes “All In Good Time” as “organic.” It was recorded live with some of the finest musicians in the industry.

Al and I discuss the new album and what he admired most about working with Nils and Lorber:

Al DeGregoris

Al DeGregoris

I HEAR PATRICK BRADLEY

On the day of the release of his third album titled “Can You Hear Me, Patrick Bradley was thrilled that fans would finally hear his new project. Bradley has spent his life playing music; he taught himself at an early age. His instrument of choice was the organ, and he displays his keen skills playing the Hammond organ on this album. The sound he projects is profoundly crisp and is a pleasure to hear. It is a rare opportunity to hear a Hammond organ played in music these days. Although Patrick has a career as a business man working for Whole Foods Market, he has never strayed from his love of music. He has always written songs and is fortunate to have made three albums. Patrick wrote this album with the concept in mind of blocking out the noise that surrounds us all of the time along with the idea of having his music speak louder. The title and first radio single is a reflection of that premise. The song and title (“Can You Hear Me”) came to him at once as he wondered if his late mother could hear his music. Making this album even greater, he joined forces with producer Jeff Lorber whom also produced his second album “Under The Sun.” Together, their chemistry is the perfect formula for making music magic. “Can You Hear Me” features Dave Koz, Rick Braun, and Eric Marienthal. Also adding their musical chops to the project are Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak, David Mann, Dwight Sills, and Michael Thompson.

Patrick and I talk about the evolution of “Can You Hear Me”:

 

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